Handling


 

Inducing Ovulation
Housing for Laying
Squeezing Eggs
Injecting

Why Xenopus?
Purchasing
Water
Water Systems
Feeding
Lighting
The Frogs
Handling
Sexing Frogs
Testes Isolation
In Vitro Ferts
Oocyte Surgery
Colony Returns
Recycling Frogs
Natural Mating
Raising Tadpoles
Health & Disease

www.xlaevis.com
info(AT)xlaevis.com
 

Google
Web Xlaevis

Updated 1/25/2006

Handling the Frogs

You should always wash your hands before attempting to pick up a frog. Never use gloves! People tend to hold more firmly with gloves and gloves cause micro-abrasions that lead to lesions. Any damage to the frog's skin greatly enhances the risk of fungal and bacterial infection.

If you are right handed, hold the frog in your left hand. If you are left handed, hold her in your right hand. Initially hold with two hands, with one hand holding the frog and the other covering her eyes until she is calm. DO NOT SQUEEZE THE FROGS. These are very delicate animals and you can cause serious injury and death by squeezing too firmly. Once she has calmed down, so that she lies limp in your hands, remove your hand that covers her eyes. You can now do injections with this free hand.

Some people develop allergies to the mucus on the frogs. In this rare case, glove use is permissible. If you must, use gloves, but a colleague might be able to help  inject the frogs for you.

Be sure to thoroughly wash your hands after handling frogs. Although it is highly unlikely that you will "pick-up" a pathogen, other aquatic reptiles (turtles) are known carriers of Salmonella. 

 

Inducing Ovulation ] Housing for Laying ] Squeezing Eggs ] Injecting ]

 

Back ] Next ]